The Maker Movement

3841178226?profile=RESIZE_710x

 

The maker movement is a social movement with an artisan spirit. Promoting equity in the maker movement is fundamental to its success in democratizing access to STEAM and other tech-rich domains. Maker culture emphasizes learning-through-doing (active learning) in a social environment.

Despite the popular myth of the lone genius-inventor, Edison and Bell both recognized the value of collaboration and invested in well-equipped lab spaces.

    pictured - Thomas Edison’s laboratory, Menlo Park, New Jersey, 1878. [Rutgers University]

The maker culture is a contemporary culture or subculture representing a technology-based extension of DIY culture that intersects with hacker culture (which is less concerned with physical objects as it focuses on software) and revels in the creation of new devices as well as tinkering with existing ones. The maker culture in general supports open-source hardware. Typical interests enjoyed by the maker culture include engineering-oriented pursuits such as electronics, robotics, 3-D printing, and the use of Computer Numeric Control tools, as well as more traditional activities such as metalworking, woodworking, and, mainly, its predecessor, the traditional arts and crafts. The subculture stresses a cut-and-paste approach to standardized hobbyist technologies, and encourages cookbook re-use of designs published on websites and maker-oriented publications. There is a strong focus on using and learning practical skills and applying them to reference designs. There is also growing work on equity and other maker culture.

E-mail me when people leave their comments –

You need to be a member of Franklin Center For Innovation, Inc. to add comments!

Join Franklin Center For Innovation, Inc.

Learn More About Steam Camps

Comment Wall

You need to be a member of Franklin Center For Innovation, Inc. to add comments!

Join Franklin Center For Innovation, Inc.

E-mail me when people leave their comments –